You are here: Home / Dr Stefan Toepfer / Page 2

CABI serves course in Integrated Pest Management for international students hungry for success

Twenty-four agricultural students from around the world, including China, Cuba, Vietnam, Myanmar, Egypt, Iran, Malaysia, Somalia, Nigeria, Ethiopia and Pakistan, have passed a five-day course in Integrated Pest Management (IPM) organised by CABI.

Legacy of AgriTT programme lives on at Rwandan biocontrol facility to fight crop pests

The legacy of the Working in Partnership for Agricultural Technology Transfer (AgriTT) programme, funded by the UK Department for International Development (DFID), is living on at a facility in Rwanda which is producing biological control agents to kill a variety of crop pests including the devastating fall armyworm.

PhD student steps up fight against western corn rootworm – a major pest of maize

A PhD student, supervised by CABI’s invasive species and maize production expert Dr Stefan Toepfer, is stepping up the fight against one of the most destructive pests of maize in North America and Europe – the western corn rootworm.

CABI shares its expertise on biological control at international congress in Beijing, China

CABI scientists have shared their expertise on biological control methods to tackle a range of agricultural pests and diseases that threaten global food security at the First International Congress of Biological Control held in Beijing, China.

CABI helps train agricultural scientists of tomorrow as part of six-day course in Hungary

CABI has helped train the agricultural scientists of tomorrow by holding a course for MSc students and young researchers keen on learning more about research methodologies in agriculture, including plant protection, at the Szent Istvan University of Gödöllo in Hungary.

PhD student joins the fight against devastating Fall Armyworm pest

A new PhD student has joined the fight against the devastating Fall Armyworm pest. CABI predicts feeding damage by the caterpillars of this invasive alien insect will cost ten of Africa’s major maize producing economies $2.2bn to $5.5bn a year in lost maize harvests if it is not properly managed.