You are here: Home / biopesticides

Regulatory harmonization in Pakistan for maximum residue limits and biopesticides

Many less developed economies in Asia, including Pakistan, face challenges in conforming to international food standards and, in particular, pesticide maximum residue limits (MRLs), either because these MRLs are not established or because the MRLs are too low for farmers to comply with. Subsequently, affecting Pakistan’s ability to trade. This project brings a new approach. Based on the strategic use of non-residue-producing biopesticides, following conventional pesticides, the approach aims to reduce residues at harvest and overcome trade barriers caused by MRL issues. CABI will work with partners and Pakistani farmers to increase their compliance with international standards, MRL regulations and enforcement.

Project launched to help mitigate pesticide residue limit export violations on red chillies in Pakistan

Drones for desert locust control in East Africa

The desert locust, Schistocerca gregaria (Forskal), is arguably the most destructive agricultural pest, globally. During 2019 and 2020, the changing weather created conditions that are favoured by the desert locust for rapid reproduction and migration and led to the pest spreading through the Horn of Africa, East Africa, Arabian Peninsula, South West Asia and West Africa. It is estimated that over 25 million people in Ethiopia, Kenya, Somalia, South Sudan, Uganda and Tanzania will face acute food insecurity in 2020 due to the desert locust plague. This initiative tests the use of drones as a new technology to complement traditional desert locust management measures, including the development of Standard Operating Procedures for optimal use of the technology. The project is initially trialled in Kenya with the potential for scaling to other affected African countries.

Evaluating the mycoherbicide potential of a leaf-spot pathogen against Japanese knotweed

Japanese knotweed is a highly invasive weed that impacts severely on native biodiversity and local infrastructure in its introduced range. Whilst chemicals are currently used to control the weed, this approach is costly and unsustainable. Biological control is an alternative method. The damaging leaf-spot fungus, Mycosphaerella polygoni-cuspidati, which attacks the plant in its native range was found not to be suitable as a classical biocontrol agent. However, the pathogen is considered to hold potential as a mycoherbicide. The aim of this project is to undertake proof-of-concept research into a potential mycoherbicide, in collaboration with the private industry.

BioSpace: Using space-enabled remote sensing for long term sustainable growth of biopesticide use

Pests and diseases cause significant losses of crops around the world and are a significant threat to food security. In China and Laos, locusts affect over two million hectares of agricultural land and recently, the fall armyworm is becoming prevalent in China and Southeast Asia, already affecting 35,000 hectares of maize in Laos. Due to a lack of detailed information on where risks to crops are greatest and farmers using inappropriate and ineffective control measures, managing the damage from pests can be problematic.

Biopesticides effectively halt the devastating fall armyworm in South Sudan